May 2020 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green
Contact: colleen_grn@yahoo.com

Writing Competitions of the Month

Cardigan Radio is a Dayton, OH, based podcast production company that is looking to release a slate of fiction-based shows in the fall. There are currently two competitions open to submit to.

1. Monologue-Submit an original 10-15 minutes monologue to be produced as part of an “audio theater” series.

2. Short Fiction-Submit an original 5,000-10,000 word piece of short fiction to be produced as part of a fiction anthology series. 

Details on requirements and submission dates are listed
on the flyers attached below. 

 

monologue guidelines 5.4.2020monologue submissions 5.4.2020
short fiction guidleines 5.4.2020short fiction guidleines 2 5.4.2020

Word of the Day

Altruism

Altruism n.  Unselfish concern for the welfare of others; selflessness.  (also ‘Altruistic’). “Despite his miserly demeanor, his life is driven by Altruism.” “Altruistic motives.

Source: http://www.wordthink.com

Quote of the Month

“Nothing happens unless
first a dream.”

Carl Sandberg

Like the Wright Writers of
Dayton Facebook Page

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If you are a serious writer, we invite you to join the Wright Writers of Dayton. We meet the last Saturday of each month at a central location.

Send an email with the subject
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Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide them with informative newsletters that list special events such as seminars at libraries, writing competitions, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signings where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

Atmosphere & Dialogue

quotes

by Colleen Green, Wright Writer of Dayton member

To show how to create atmosphere with dialogue I’m using a section from my book, City in the Middle. One version is the rough draft and the other is the final version. This will demonstrate the importance of creating a mood with editing. Below in this example, without the atmosphere of the pub and details of the main character’s feelings, it is rigid and uninteresting.

Rough draft of dialogue:

“Miss, excuse me,” a lady called out. “We’re ready to order now.”

I turned around and stepped up to her table. “Yes, ma’am, what can I get you?”

I took their orders as an Irish lullaby played. On the way to put the orders into the computer, I felt someone tapping my shoulder.

“Amber.”

I turned around.

“I’m Charles,” he said. “Henry’s big brother. He pointed you out to me when you arrived.”

“It’s nice to meet you.”

“You too. Could you to do me a favor while I step out for a few minutes?”

“Sure.”

“You see that table in the back with the ‘reserved’ sign?”

I looked over and saw three men sitting there. “Yeah.”

“I need to follow my dad upstairs to his apartment, so I have to leave for a while. Please keep an eye on those guys and make sure they are taken care of.”

“Will do.”

Notice the lack of emotion. Not many details about Amber’s surroundings as she waits on tables, and there is not much insight on how she feels. Now let’s add some details using the feelings of the main character. 

From book final version:

“Miss, excuse me,” a lady called out. “We’re ready to order now.”

I turned around and stepped up to her table. “Yes, ma’am, what can I get you?”

I took their orders as an Irish lullaby played. The violin combined with the flute to create a serene sound. On the way to put the orders into the computer, I paused near the stage, enchanted by the music.

Fiona leaned into each movement of the bow. She appeared to be living in the moment, becoming one with the music. For a few seconds, so did I.

I felt someone tapping my shoulder. “Amber.”

I turned around and saw a man who looked like an older version of Henry.

“I’m Charles,” he said. “Henry’s big brother. He pointed you out to me when you arrived.”

“It’s nice to meet you.”

“You too.” He smiled like his brother, with a quirky grin. “Could you do me a favor while I step out for a few minutes?”

“Sure.” I was surprised he was asking a newbie but kind of flattered that Henry must have told him enough positive things about me that he could feel comfortable enough to ask for favors.

“You see that table in the back with the ‘reserved’ sign?”

I looked over and saw three men sitting there. “Yeah.” One of them, a Hispanic man, had an unusual cane with an eagle head for the handle propped up on his chair.

“I need to follow my dad upstairs to his apartment, so I have to leave for a while. Please keep an eye on those guys and make sure they are taken care of.”

“Will do.”

Did you catch the parts that were added showing Amber’s feelings and what the characters were doing within the conversation? Did you notice the body language and description of the character’s appearance? They are in bold above. Pacing dialogue is tricky, but it can be done. Read it out loud after you write it to make sure it flows naturally.

This information came from author Colleen Green. She has created a series of videos on the Wright Writers of Dayton Facebook page called Colleen’s Corner: Advice for Writers. You can click the link below to go to their page. Videos are pinned at the top of their posts on their page. Also, you can view all their videos under the video section on their Facebook page. 

 

Click link below to the Wright Writers of Dayton Facebook page:
www.facebook.com/wrightwriters

Click the link below to go to author Colleen Green’s website:
www.colleengreen.info

Writing Tips

Colleen’s Corner:
Advice for Writers

colleen green bio pictureWright Writers of Dayton is a group from Dayton, Ohio. Author Colleen Green, their marketing director is doing live videos on different aspects of writing. These short episodes will feature different aspects of storytelling. The latest one can be found on their Facebook page under the pinned post at the top. Colleen’s first video talks about plot & character development. She plans to do a different topic on Tuesdays at 7 pm eastern standard time. The videos will be called Colleen’s Corner: Advice for Writers. You can view the pinned post and videos on their page anytime and comment on them anytime. During the live video comment “hi”, and she’ll give you a shout out. Click the link at the bottom of this post to see the Wright Writers of Dayton Facebook page.

www.facebook.com/wrightwriters

April 2020 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green
Contact: colleen_grn@yahoo.com

Book of the Month
Mastering Plot Twists:

How to Use Suspense, Targeted
Storytelling Strategies,
and Structure to Captivate
Your Readers

mastering plot twists

 Available on Amazon

Words of the Month

“Epidemic” vs. “Pandemic”: What Do These Terms Mean?

What is an epidemic?

An epidemic disease is one “affecting many persons at the same time, and spreading from person to person in a locality where the disease is not permanently prevalent.” The World Health Organization (WHO) further specifies epidemic as occurring at the level of a region or community.

Epidemic is commonly used all on its own as a noun, meaning “a temporary prevalence of a disease.” For example: The city was able to stop the flu epidemic before it spread across the state.

Metaphorically, epidemic is “a rapid spread or increase in the occurrence of something,” usually with a negative or humorous connotation: An epidemic of gentrification was affecting low-income communities or The hipster look gave way to an epidemic of 1990s fashion.

What is a pandemic?

Compared to an epidemic disease, a pandemic disease is an epidemic that has spread over a large area, that is, it’s “prevalent throughout an entire country, continent, or the whole world.”

Pandemic is also used as a noun, meaning “a pandemic disease.” The WHO more specifically defines a pandemic as “a worldwide spread of a new disease.” On March 11, the WHO officially declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic due to the global spread and severity of the disease.

While pandemic can be used for a disease that has spread across an entire country or other large landmass, the word is generally reserved for diseases that have spread across continents or the entire world. For instance: After documenting cases in all continents except Antarctica, scientists declared the disease a pandemic.

As an adjective, pandemic can also mean “general” and “universal,” also often with a negative connotation. However, pandemic appears to be most commonly used in the context of epidemiology, which is concerned with infectious diseases.

How to use epidemic vs. pandemic

… think of an epidemic as the start of something—whether a disease or a trend—spreading rapidly within a community or region, whereas a pandemic is what an epidemic becomes once it reaches a far wider swath of people, especially across continents or the entire world.

If something is spreading like wildfire, it’s an epidemic. If something has already spread like wildfire and is currently massive in its reach and impact, it’s a pandemic.

And for good measure … here’s another example of each in a sentence.

  • The city had to close schools to contain a measles epidemic.
  • Although it isn’t exactly known where the disease first originated, the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic is estimated to have affected one-third of people across the entire globe.

Your mind is like a garden. Your
thoughts are the seeds.
You can grow flowers
or you can grow weeds.

Source: The Farmers’ Almanac

If you are a serious writer, we invite you to join the Wright Writers of Dayton. We meet the last Saturday of each month at a central location.

Send an email with the subject
“I want to join the WWD”
to ruthapeck@aol.com.
We will reply to you with
more information.

Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. Click on the “follow” button. Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide our followers with informative newsletters every month. Our followers will be the first to know when we have special events such as writing seminars at libraries, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signing events where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

Follow today and get the benefits every month!

Author of the Month: March 2020

Wright Writers of Dayton will honor one member of the group by selecting them to be the author of the month. This March we celebrate Ruth Kibler Peck, the head of our group.

Author of the Month

Ruth Kibler Peck

Ruth Ann Bio PhotoBio: Ruth Ann married her high school sweetheart, Walter Peck, and they have five grown children, eight grandchildren, and one great-grandchild. She graduated with High Honors from Wright State University at age 40 and taught English for 21 years at Northmont Junior High in Englewood, Ohio. In 1990 she was honored as one of Ohio’s Top Ten Teachers from 7,000 nominees. She has won dozens of national, state, and local prizes for her poetry – see Rowing Through the Night. Poverty, Puberty, & Patriotism is her seventh book and was written especially for teenagers and for those who remember the special years of World War II.

WWII book

Press Release of
Poverty, Puberty, & Patriotism:
A Dayton Girl Grows Up During

World War II
by Ruth Kibler Peck

Youth Dares to Dream Beyond
Fears in World War II

Tucson, AZ – Before America waved her victorious star-spangled banner, a young teen, who lived in bustling Dayton, Ohio, had witnessed the devastating and massive revolution of World War II. As she dreamed to live a modest and peaceful life, World War II was her living nightmare. Now a published author, Ruth Kibler Peck recollects as her nightmares come to life on her recently launched book Poverty, Puberty, & Patriotism: A Dayton Girl Grows Up During World War II.

The book opens on that fateful Sunday afternoon on the 7th of December, 1941 — the day of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The horrifying sequence of events created a quaking fear on the lives of the Kibler Family, especially with her mother’s life-threatening illness and her father’s meager salary. As the Great Depression ended and World War II began, their drastic challenge of finding hope in sustaining their home was a remarkable event that Ruth could remember even until today.

Ruth’s memoir is similarly narrated like The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank. While both books shared their personal experiences during wars, Ruth and Anne aimed to empower young girls and teenagers to strive higher in faith and hope in spite of youthful innocence.

Ruth’s work will be featured at the Tucson Festival of Books 2020, to be held at the University of Arizona this coming March 14-15 at the Authors Press booth 136.

Click below to buy the book.
Poverty, Puberty, & Patriotism:

Poverty, Puberty, & Patriotism 
is available at Authors Press,
Amazon, Barnes & Noble,
and other online book retailers.

Click below for more information
about the author and the event.
www.authorspress.com.

Source of Press Release: Author Press

Authors Press is an online publishing company and book reseller catering to the needs of both experienced and aspiring authors as well as readers. They offer the best publishing solutions for full-time and independent authors. The company’s team of proofreaders, editors, designers, and publishing professionals are committed in fulfilling industry standards for their client’s work to be published, marketed, and sold.

February Newsletter 2020

Editor: Colleen Green
Contact: colleen_grn@yahoo.com

Book of the Month

My Child, I’ll Still Be Loving You

by Vickie L Weaver
Illustrator Kattarina Storost

611hb4IqcIL._SX491_BO1,204,203,200_

Turtles telling the time of day? Crocodiles eating birthday cake? Porcupines playing peek-a-boo? Oh, no! What’s a child to do? There’s so much more with animals galore. The solution comes from a comforting source.

Click link below to buy book:
https://www.amazon.com/Child-Ill-Still-Loving

Quote of the Month

“Before you focus on how far you have to go, take a minute to appreciate
how far you have gone.”
Colleen Green

Wright Writers of Dayton member,
author of romantic suspense books,
and public speaker
click below for her website
www.colleengreen.info

Word of the Month

Nuance n. A subtle difference in or shade of meaning, expression, or sound. “Subtle nuances of her on-screen character.”

Source: http://www.wordthink.com

Like the Wright Writers of
Dayton Facebook Page

Click link below.
www.facebook.com/wright

If you are a serious writer, we invite you to join the Wright Writers of Dayton. We meet the last Saturday of each month at a central location.

Send an email with the subject
“I want to join the WWD”
to ruthapeck@aol.com.
We will reply to you with
more information.

Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. Click on the “follow” button. Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide our followers with informative newsletters every month. Our followers will be the first to know when we have special events such as writing seminars at libraries, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signing events where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

Follow today and get the benefits every month!

July 2019 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green

Book of the Month

It’s a Sweet Thing: Candy Break:
The Taste of Homemade Goodness

Judith Craig Fryman

Candy book

Source: Description from Amazon

Imagine if your grandmother owned a candy store! Or if your cousin, mother, sister, fellow parishioner, neighbor, or friend had an excellent sweet shop in an old bank building with a special vault filled with chocolate and your favorite books. It’s a Sweet Thing is a 33-year history of Judith Craig Fryman’s fun adventure in owning such a candy store beginning in 1985 in Brookville, Ohio. Her simple mission as owner of the Candy Break was to provide wholesome, handmade treats to everyone in town and to interesting customers from far-off places. The impact of her efforts was more far-reaching and enriching than you might first expect. 

Click below to buy:
www.amazon.com/Its-Sweet-Thing

Word of the Month
flounce

Definition: 1 a : to move with exaggerated jerky or bouncy motions 
b : to go with sudden determination 
2 : flounder, struggle

Did You Know?

The story behind flounce is an elusive one. The verb’s earliest recorded uses in English occurred in the mid-1500s, and some scholars believe it is related to the Norwegian verb flunsa (meaning “to hurry” or “to work briskly”) and Swedish flunsa (“to fall with a splash” or “to plunge”). The connection is uncertain, however, because the flunsa verbs did not appear in their respective languages until the 18th century, long after flounce surfaced in English. A second distinct sense of flounce, referring to a strip or ruffle of fabric attached on one edge, did not appear in English until the 18th century. This flounce derives from the Middle English frouncen, meaning “to curl.”

Examples

“With skirts flouncing, 15 young women ascended the steps … to a traditional Mexican birthday song played in a mariachi style.” — Laurel Wamsley and Vanessa Romo, NPR, 19 July 2017

“The Master of the Music flounced out with the choir flouncing out in perfect unison behind him.” — Terry Pratchett, Unseen Academicals, 2009

Source: www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

Quote of the Month

quote earlnightingale2-2xSource: www.brainyquote.com/

Like the Wright Writers of
Dayton Facebook Page

Click link below.
www.facebook.com/wright

If you are a serious writer, we invite you to join the Wright Writers of Dayton. We meet the last Saturday of each month at a central location.

Send an email with the subject
“I want to join the WWD”
to ruthapeck@aol.com.
We will reply to you with
more information.

Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. Click on the “follow” button. Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide our followers with informative newsletters every month. Our followers will be the first to know when we have special events such as writing seminars at libraries, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signing events where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

Follow today and get the benefits every month!