Author of the Month: March 2020

Wright Writers of Dayton will honor one member of the group by selecting them to be the author of the month. This March we celebrate Ruth Kibler Peck, the head of our group.

Author of the Month

Ruth Kibler Peck

Ruth Ann Bio PhotoBio: Ruth Ann married her high school sweetheart, Walter Peck, and they have five grown children, eight grandchildren, and one great-grandchild. She graduated with High Honors from Wright State University at age 40 and taught English for 21 years at Northmont Junior High in Englewood, Ohio. In 1990 she was honored as one of Ohio’s Top Ten Teachers from 7,000 nominees. She has won dozens of national, state, and local prizes for her poetry – see Rowing Through the Night. Poverty, Puberty, & Patriotism is her seventh book and was written especially for teenagers and for those who remember the special years of World War II.

WWII book

Press Release of
Poverty, Puberty, & Patriotism:
A Dayton Girl Grows Up During

World War II
by Ruth Kibler Peck

Youth Dares to Dream Beyond
Fears in World War II

Tucson, AZ – Before America waved her victorious star-spangled banner, a young teen, who lived in bustling Dayton, Ohio, had witnessed the devastating and massive revolution of World War II. As she dreamed to live a modest and peaceful life, World War II was her living nightmare. Now a published author, Ruth Kibler Peck recollects as her nightmares come to life on her recently launched book Poverty, Puberty, & Patriotism: A Dayton Girl Grows Up During World War II.

The book opens on that fateful Sunday afternoon on the 7th of December, 1941 — the day of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The horrifying sequence of events created a quaking fear on the lives of the Kibler Family, especially with her mother’s life-threatening illness and her father’s meager salary. As the Great Depression ended and World War II began, their drastic challenge of finding hope in sustaining their home was a remarkable event that Ruth could remember even until today.

Ruth’s memoir is similarly narrated like The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank. While both books shared their personal experiences during wars, Ruth and Anne aimed to empower young girls and teenagers to strive higher in faith and hope in spite of youthful innocence.

Ruth’s work will be featured at the Tucson Festival of Books 2020, to be held at the University of Arizona this coming March 14-15 at the Authors Press booth 136.

Click below to buy the book.
Poverty, Puberty, & Patriotism:

Poverty, Puberty, & Patriotism 
is available at Authors Press,
Amazon, Barnes & Noble,
and other online book retailers.

Click below for more information
about the author and the event.
www.authorspress.com.

Source of Press Release: Author Press

Authors Press is an online publishing company and book reseller catering to the needs of both experienced and aspiring authors as well as readers. They offer the best publishing solutions for full-time and independent authors. The company’s team of proofreaders, editors, designers, and publishing professionals are committed in fulfilling industry standards for their client’s work to be published, marketed, and sold.

March 2020 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green
Contact: colleen_grn@yahoo.com

Book of the Month

Book Girl: A Journey through the
Treasures and Transforming Power 

of a Reading Life

by Sarah Clarkson 

book girl cover

This book has been recommended by the head of the Wright Writers of Dayton and author, Ruth Kibler Peck.

Description of book from Amazon

When you hear a riveting story, does it thrill your heart and stir your soul? Do you hunger for truth and goodness? Do you secretly relate to Belle’s delight in the library in Beauty and the Beast?

If so, you may be on your way to being a book girl.

Books were always Sarah Clarkson’s delight. Raised in the company of the lively Anne of Green Gables, the brave Pevensie children of Narnia, and the wise Austen heroines, she discovered reading early on as a daily gift, a way of encountering the world in all its wonder. But what she came to realize as an adult was just how powerfully books had shaped her as a woman to live a story within that world, to be a lifelong learner, to grasp hope in struggle, and to create and act with courage.

She’s convinced that books can do the same for you.

Join Sarah in exploring the reading life as a gift and an adventure, one meant to enrich, broaden, and delight you in each season of your life as a woman. In Book Girl, you’ll discover:

  • how reading can strengthen your spiritual life and deepen your faith,
  • why a journey through classic literature might be just what you need (and where to begin),
  • how stories form your sense of identity,
  • how Sarah’s parents raised her to be a reader—and what you can do to cultivate a love of reading in the growing readers around you, and
  • 20+ annotated book lists, including some old favorites and many new discoveries.

Whether you’ve long considered yourself a reader or have dreams of becoming one, Book Girl will draw you into the life-giving journey of becoming a woman who reads and lives well.

Available on Amazon. Click link below.

Word of the Day

Coltish adj. Energetic but awkward in one’s movements or behavior. Playful, not trained or disciplined. “Coltish horseplay to celebrate their graduation.”

Source: http://www.wordthink.com

Quote of the Month

I think it’s an Irish thing.
We don’t really care.
We say it as we mean it,
and you have
to deal with it.
The truth is the truth.

Conor McGregor

Source: https://www.brainyquote.com

Like the Wright Writers of
Dayton Facebook Page

Click link below.
www.facebook.com/wright

If you are a serious writer, we invite you to join the Wright Writers of Dayton. We meet the last Saturday of each month at a central location.

Send an email with the subject
“I want to join the WWD”
to ruthapeck@aol.com.
We will reply to you with
more information.

Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. Click on the “follow” button. Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide our followers with informative newsletters every month. Our followers will be the first to know when we have special events such as writing seminars at libraries, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signing events where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

February Newsletter 2020

Editor: Colleen Green
Contact: colleen_grn@yahoo.com

Book of the Month

My Child, I’ll Still Be Loving You

by Vickie L Weaver
Illustrator Kattarina Storost

611hb4IqcIL._SX491_BO1,204,203,200_

Turtles telling the time of day? Crocodiles eating birthday cake? Porcupines playing peek-a-boo? Oh, no! What’s a child to do? There’s so much more with animals galore. The solution comes from a comforting source.

Click link below to buy book:
https://www.amazon.com/Child-Ill-Still-Loving

Quote of the Month

“Before you focus on how far you have to go, take a minute to appreciate
how far you have gone.”
Colleen Green

Wright Writers of Dayton member,
author of romantic suspense books,
and public speaker
click below for her website
www.colleengreen.info

Word of the Month

Nuance n. A subtle difference in or shade of meaning, expression, or sound. “Subtle nuances of her on-screen character.”

Source: http://www.wordthink.com

Like the Wright Writers of
Dayton Facebook Page

Click link below.
www.facebook.com/wright

If you are a serious writer, we invite you to join the Wright Writers of Dayton. We meet the last Saturday of each month at a central location.

Send an email with the subject
“I want to join the WWD”
to ruthapeck@aol.com.
We will reply to you with
more information.

Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. Click on the “follow” button. Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide our followers with informative newsletters every month. Our followers will be the first to know when we have special events such as writing seminars at libraries, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signing events where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

Follow today and get the benefits every month!

August 2019 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green
contact: colleen_grn@yahoo.com

Book of the Month

Whispers of Time
Chronicles of Asaetara Book 1

Whispers of Time

In the world of Asaetara, an ancient magic has torn open the paths between worlds. An unknown banner begins to gather the forces of evil together in the shadows. Rin Rilavaenu has struggled her entire life to please her father, the elven king. Much to her dismay, Rin discovers the elf she is so desperate to make proud is not her real father. After this revelation throws Rin’s world into complete turmoil, on the day of her comping of age ceremony, her soul is torn from her body when unknown magic is forced out by her enemies. After years of searching, Kaedin, Rin’s bonded dragon, finds her when her soul begins to awaken inside of Sara, a nineteen-year-old human girl from Earth. How can they close the paths torn open between worlds? Who is behind this and what do they wish to gain? Rin’s friends and family embark on a journey to an unfamiliar world to bring her home, while they struggle to prepare for a war that could destroy everything in not only their world but ours as well.

Source: Amazon

Available on Amazon.
Link to buy below.
https://tinyurl.com/y5valye7

Gwendolyn Ilimaris is a Wright Writer of Dayton Member.

Like Gwendolyn Ilimaris’s Facebook page at 
www.facebook.com/gwenilimaris/

Quote of the Month

In a novel you have to resist the urge to tell everything.

J. K. Rowling

Source: www.brainyquote.com

Upcoming Book Events for Readers

Wright Writer of Dayton member, Author Colleen Green will be at the Summer Book Fair 2019. She will have her romantic suspense books in the Amber Milestone Series available for sale. Meet her and other authors and grab a beer. Details below.

Saturday, Aug. 17th
Mother Stewart’s Brewing
102 West Columbia Street
Springfield, Ohio 45504
12 pm -7 pm

Author Colleen Green’s website: www.colleengreen.info

Word of the Month

desideratum

Did You Know?

We’d like to introduce you to some close cousins of the common word desire. All trace their roots to the Latin sīder-, or sīdus, which has historically been understood to mean “heavenly body,” but which may also have an older, non-celestial meaning of “mark, target, goal.” Whether etymologically starry or grounded, dēsīderāre, meaning “to long for,” was born when Latin de- was prefixed to sīder-. Dēsīderāre begat Anglo-French desirer, which in turn brought forth English desire, desirous, and desirable in the 13th and 14th centuries, with desideration following in the 15th. Then, in the 17th century, English acquired desiderate (“to wish for”) and desideratum (desiderata in the plural), all of which can lay claim to direct ancestry from desiderare.

Examples

“The strength of his class depended to some extent on sound money management—but depended to a much larger extent on marriages based cynically on the sorts of children likely to be produced. Healthy, charming, wise children were the desiderata.” — Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., The Sirens of Titan, 1959

Source: www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

Like the Wright Writers of
Dayton Facebook Page

Click link below.
www.facebook.com/wright

If you are a serious writer, we invite you to join the Wright Writers of Dayton. We meet the last Saturday of each month at a central location.

Send an email with the subject
“I want to join the WWD”
to ruthapeck@aol.com.
We will reply to you with
more information.

Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. Click on the “follow” button. Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide our followers with informative newsletters every month. Our followers will be the first to know when we have special events such as writing seminars at libraries, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signing events where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

Follow today and get the benefits every month!

July 2019 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green

Book of the Month

It’s a Sweet Thing: Candy Break:
The Taste of Homemade Goodness

Judith Craig Fryman

Candy book

Source: Description from Amazon

Imagine if your grandmother owned a candy store! Or if your cousin, mother, sister, fellow parishioner, neighbor, or friend had an excellent sweet shop in an old bank building with a special vault filled with chocolate and your favorite books. It’s a Sweet Thing is a 33-year history of Judith Craig Fryman’s fun adventure in owning such a candy store beginning in 1985 in Brookville, Ohio. Her simple mission as owner of the Candy Break was to provide wholesome, handmade treats to everyone in town and to interesting customers from far-off places. The impact of her efforts was more far-reaching and enriching than you might first expect. 

Click below to buy:
www.amazon.com/Its-Sweet-Thing

Word of the Month
flounce

Definition: 1 a : to move with exaggerated jerky or bouncy motions 
b : to go with sudden determination 
2 : flounder, struggle

Did You Know?

The story behind flounce is an elusive one. The verb’s earliest recorded uses in English occurred in the mid-1500s, and some scholars believe it is related to the Norwegian verb flunsa (meaning “to hurry” or “to work briskly”) and Swedish flunsa (“to fall with a splash” or “to plunge”). The connection is uncertain, however, because the flunsa verbs did not appear in their respective languages until the 18th century, long after flounce surfaced in English. A second distinct sense of flounce, referring to a strip or ruffle of fabric attached on one edge, did not appear in English until the 18th century. This flounce derives from the Middle English frouncen, meaning “to curl.”

Examples

“With skirts flouncing, 15 young women ascended the steps … to a traditional Mexican birthday song played in a mariachi style.” — Laurel Wamsley and Vanessa Romo, NPR, 19 July 2017

“The Master of the Music flounced out with the choir flouncing out in perfect unison behind him.” — Terry Pratchett, Unseen Academicals, 2009

Source: www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

Quote of the Month

quote earlnightingale2-2xSource: www.brainyquote.com/

Like the Wright Writers of
Dayton Facebook Page

Click link below.
www.facebook.com/wright

If you are a serious writer, we invite you to join the Wright Writers of Dayton. We meet the last Saturday of each month at a central location.

Send an email with the subject
“I want to join the WWD”
to ruthapeck@aol.com.
We will reply to you with
more information.

Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. Click on the “follow” button. Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide our followers with informative newsletters every month. Our followers will be the first to know when we have special events such as writing seminars at libraries, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signing events where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

Follow today and get the benefits every month!

 

June 2019 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green

Poem of the Month

CACTUS TEARS

By Vickie L. Weaver

I carefully sweep his mom’s Christmas cactus
leaves, their blooms still
red with promise,
all by his tears long sodden,
drooped and fallen
into darkness
between the table and the wall—
then gently gather them
into the ready receptacle
and carry them to the rich garden
where chameleon skies
can reflect green eyes.

Quote of the Month

Character is like a tree and reputation like a shadow. The shadow is what we think of it; the tree is the real thing.

Abraham Lincoln 

Source: www.brainyquote.com/

Word of the Month

pronunciation: rih-MIT-unss


Definition

1 a : a sum of money remitted

b : an instrument by which money is remitted

2 : transmittal of money (as to a distant place)

Did You Know?

Since the 14th century, the verb remit has afforded a variety of meanings, including “to lay aside (a mood or disposition),” “to release from the guilt or penalty of,” “to submit or refer for consideration,” and “to postpone or defer.” It is derived from Latin mittere (meaning “to let go” or “to send”), which is also the root of the English verbs admit, commit, emit, omit, permit, submit, and transmit. Use of remittance in financial contexts referring to the release of money as payment isn’t transacted until the 17th century.


Examples

“PayPal has everything it needs to send money to friends or family or to pay bills, even across borders. Its acquisition of Xoom in 2015 gave it a strong position in digital remittance.” — Adam Levy, The Motley Fool, 14 Dec. 2018

“Kit … knew that his old home was a very poor place…, and often indited square-folded letters to his mother, enclosing a shilling or eighteenpence or such other small remittance, which Mr Abel’s liberality enabled him to make.” — Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop, 1841

Source: www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

Like the Wright Writers of
Dayton Facebook Page

Click link below.

www.facebook.com/wright

If you are a serious writer, we invite you to join the Wright Writers of Dayton. We meet the last Saturday of each month at a central location.

Send an email with the subject
“I want to join the WWD”
to ruthapeck@aol.com.
We will reply to you with
more information.

Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. Click on the “follow” button. Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide our followers with informative newsletters every month. Our followers will be the first to know when we have special events such as writing seminars at libraries, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signing events where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

Follow today and get the benefits every month!

May 2019 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green

Book of the Month

Stein On Writing: A Master Editor of Some of the Most Successful Writers of Our Century Shares His Craft Techniques and Strategies

Stein on Writing provides immediately useful advice for all writers of fiction and nonfiction, whether they are newcomers or old hands, students or instructors, amateurs or professionals. As the always clear and direct Stein explains here, “This is not a book of theory. It is a book of usable solutions–how to fix writing that is flawed, how to improve writing that is good, how to create interesting writing in the first place.” With examples from bestsellers as well as from students’ drafts, Stein offers detailed sections on characterization, dialogue, pacing, flashbacks, trimming away flabby wording, the so-called “triage” method of revision, using the techniques of fiction to enliven nonfiction, and more.Stein on Writing provides immediately useful advice for all writers of fiction and nonfiction, whether they are newcomers or old hands, students or instructors, amateurs or professionals. As the always clear and direct Stein explains here, “This is not a book of theory. It is a book of usable solutions–how to fix writing that is flawed, how to improve writing that is good, how to create interesting writing in the first place.” With examples from bestsellers as well as from students’ drafts, Stein offers detailed sections on characterization, dialogue, pacing, flashbacks, trimming away flabby wording, the so-called “triage” method of revision, using the techniques of fiction to enliven nonfiction, and more.

Source: Amazon

Quote of the Month

Nurturing Idea - Raindrops Falling on Sprout Growing on Hand

Some authors, when starting a novel, imagine a place first. Others, a character starts taking shape in their head. I start with a hook, a situation, a ‘what if.’

Linwood Barclay

Source: https://www.brainyquote.com/

Word of the Month

inexorable

pronunciation:  i-NEK-suh-ruh-bul

Definition : not to be persuaded, moved, or stopped : relentless

Did You Know?

The Latin antecedent of inexorable is inexorabilis, which is itself a combination of the prefix in-, meaning “not,” plus exorabilis, meaning “pliant” or “capable of being moved by entreaty.” It’s a fitting etymology for inexorable. You can beseech and implore until you’re blue in the face, but that won’t have any effect on something that’s inexorable. Inexorable has been a part of the English language since the 1500s. Originally, it was often applied to people or sometimes to personified things, as in “deaf and inexorable laws.” These days, it is usually applied to things, as in “inexorable monotony” or “an inexorable trend.” In such cases, it essentially means “unyielding” or “inflexible.”

Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

Like the Wright Writers of
Dayton Facebook Page

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Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. Click on the “follow” button. Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide our followers with informative newsletters every month. Our followers will be the first to know when we have special events such as writing seminars at libraries, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signing events where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

Follow today and get the benefits every month!