May 2020 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green
Contact: colleen_grn@yahoo.com

Writing Competitions of the Month

Cardigan Radio is a Dayton, OH, based podcast production company that is looking to release a slate of fiction-based shows in the fall. There are currently two competitions open to submit to.

1. Monologue-Submit an original 10-15 minutes monologue to be produced as part of an “audio theater” series.

2. Short Fiction-Submit an original 5,000-10,000 word piece of short fiction to be produced as part of a fiction anthology series. 

Details on requirements and submission dates are listed
on the flyers attached below. 

 

monologue guidelines 5.4.2020monologue submissions 5.4.2020
short fiction guidleines 5.4.2020short fiction guidleines 2 5.4.2020

Word of the Day

Altruism

Altruism n.  Unselfish concern for the welfare of others; selflessness.  (also ‘Altruistic’). “Despite his miserly demeanor, his life is driven by Altruism.” “Altruistic motives.

Source: http://www.wordthink.com

Quote of the Month

“Nothing happens unless
first a dream.”

Carl Sandberg

Like the Wright Writers of
Dayton Facebook Page

Click link below.
www.facebook.com/wright

If you are a serious writer, we invite you to join the Wright Writers of Dayton. We meet the last Saturday of each month at a central location.

Send an email with the subject
“I want to join the WWD”
to colleen_grn@yahoo.com
We will reply to you with
more information.

Follow this blog to get notified via
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Click on the “follow” button.

Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide them with informative newsletters that list special events such as seminars at libraries, writing competitions, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signings where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

Writing Tips

Colleen’s Corner:
Advice for Writers

colleen green bio pictureWright Writers of Dayton is a group from Dayton, Ohio. Author Colleen Green, their marketing director is doing live videos on different aspects of writing. These short episodes will feature different aspects of storytelling. The latest one can be found on their Facebook page under the pinned post at the top. Colleen’s first video talks about plot & character development. She plans to do a different topic on Tuesdays at 7 pm eastern standard time. The videos will be called Colleen’s Corner: Advice for Writers. You can view the pinned post and videos on their page anytime and comment on them anytime. During the live video comment “hi”, and she’ll give you a shout out. Click the link at the bottom of this post to see the Wright Writers of Dayton Facebook page.

www.facebook.com/wrightwriters

April 2020 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green
Contact: colleen_grn@yahoo.com

Book of the Month
Mastering Plot Twists:

How to Use Suspense, Targeted
Storytelling Strategies,
and Structure to Captivate
Your Readers

mastering plot twists

 Available on Amazon

Words of the Month

“Epidemic” vs. “Pandemic”: What Do These Terms Mean?

What is an epidemic?

An epidemic disease is one “affecting many persons at the same time, and spreading from person to person in a locality where the disease is not permanently prevalent.” The World Health Organization (WHO) further specifies epidemic as occurring at the level of a region or community.

Epidemic is commonly used all on its own as a noun, meaning “a temporary prevalence of a disease.” For example: The city was able to stop the flu epidemic before it spread across the state.

Metaphorically, epidemic is “a rapid spread or increase in the occurrence of something,” usually with a negative or humorous connotation: An epidemic of gentrification was affecting low-income communities or The hipster look gave way to an epidemic of 1990s fashion.

What is a pandemic?

Compared to an epidemic disease, a pandemic disease is an epidemic that has spread over a large area, that is, it’s “prevalent throughout an entire country, continent, or the whole world.”

Pandemic is also used as a noun, meaning “a pandemic disease.” The WHO more specifically defines a pandemic as “a worldwide spread of a new disease.” On March 11, the WHO officially declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic due to the global spread and severity of the disease.

While pandemic can be used for a disease that has spread across an entire country or other large landmass, the word is generally reserved for diseases that have spread across continents or the entire world. For instance: After documenting cases in all continents except Antarctica, scientists declared the disease a pandemic.

As an adjective, pandemic can also mean “general” and “universal,” also often with a negative connotation. However, pandemic appears to be most commonly used in the context of epidemiology, which is concerned with infectious diseases.

How to use epidemic vs. pandemic

… think of an epidemic as the start of something—whether a disease or a trend—spreading rapidly within a community or region, whereas a pandemic is what an epidemic becomes once it reaches a far wider swath of people, especially across continents or the entire world.

If something is spreading like wildfire, it’s an epidemic. If something has already spread like wildfire and is currently massive in its reach and impact, it’s a pandemic.

And for good measure … here’s another example of each in a sentence.

  • The city had to close schools to contain a measles epidemic.
  • Although it isn’t exactly known where the disease first originated, the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic is estimated to have affected one-third of people across the entire globe.

Your mind is like a garden. Your
thoughts are the seeds.
You can grow flowers
or you can grow weeds.

Source: The Farmers’ Almanac

If you are a serious writer, we invite you to join the Wright Writers of Dayton. We meet the last Saturday of each month at a central location.

Send an email with the subject
“I want to join the WWD”
to ruthapeck@aol.com.
We will reply to you with
more information.

Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. Click on the “follow” button. Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide our followers with informative newsletters every month. Our followers will be the first to know when we have special events such as writing seminars at libraries, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signing events where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

Follow today and get the benefits every month!

September 2019 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green
contact: colleen_grn@yahoo.com

Upcoming Library Events 

Frances, Wright Writer of Dayton member, is the speaker at the Stirring Up Food and Memories Seminar. A cookbook can contain more than recipes, it can be a historical document for your family. One that contains the stories behind the food. Preparing food and family dinners can evoke memories and emotions; as you eat, you may think of family, friends, and events related to those foods. Learn how to create and organize your own family cookbook to save not just recipes, but the memories of those important to you.

Stirring Up Food and Memories

Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019
6:30 PM – 8:00 PM

Brookville Library
Community Room
20 Blue Pride Drive
Brookville, OH 45309

Huber Heights Library
Meeting Room
6160 Chambersburg Rd.
Huber Heights, OH 45424


Vickie Weaver, Wright Writer of Dayton member, author of three books, and coauthor of a fourth is the speaker at the Writing a Historical Fiction/Nonfiction Short Story Seminar What does historical fiction have to do with fiction, and can you combine them to make a great story? What elements bring such a story to life? What are the do’s and don’ts for writing historical stories? Learn these things and more from author Vickie Weaver.

Monday, Sept. 16, 2019
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM

Miami Township Library
Community Room
2718 Lyons Rd.
Miamisburg, OH 45342

Book of the Month

Visionary

Making a difference in a
world that needs YOU

visionary book

In compelling, concise, easy-to-read chapters, Visionary: Making a Difference in a World that Needs YOU makes the case that ordinary people can create extraordinary change in the world by learning and applying four basic principles distilled from visionaries of our past and present.

You’ll discover: 

* The major difference between a visionary and a dreamer

* A step-by-step process for discovering how you can make a difference in the world 

* A step-by-step process for crafting a vision for you or your organization

* A step-by-step process for creating a roadmap to achieving your vision

* Four questions you must answer before people will buy-in to your vision 

* Six characteristics of someone who has found their purpose 

* How busy people can still make a difference in the world

Filled with practical, actionable strategies and exercises. This book will guide you to a life of meaning, contribution, vision and purpose.

Book description source: Amazon

Click below to buy.
www.amazon.com/gp/product

Quote of the Month

Your problem is to bridge the gap which exists between where you are now and the goal you intend to reach.

Earl Nightingale

Source: http://www.brainyquote.com

Word of the Month
smite

Definition
1 : to strike sharply or heavily especially with the hand
2 : to kill or severely injure by striking
3 : to cause to strike
4 : to affect as if by striking
5 : captivate, take

Did You Know?

Today’s word has been part of the English language for a very long time; the earliest documented use in print dates to the 12th century. Smite can be traced back to the Old English smītan, meaning “to smear or defile.” Smītan is akin to the Scottish word smit, meaning “to stain, contaminate, or infect,” as well as to the Old High German bismīzan, “to defile.” In addition to its “strike” and “attack” senses, smite has a softer side. As of the mid-17th century, it can mean “to captivate or take”—a sense that is frequently used in the past participle in such contexts as “smitten by her beauty” or “smitten with him” (meaning “in love with him”). Its past tense is smote.

Example

The cartoon’s villain was, as tradition would have it, smote by an anvil dropping mysteriously from the sky.

Source: www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

Like the Wright Writers of
Dayton Facebook Page

Click link below.
www.facebook.com/wright

If you are a serious writer, we invite you to join the Wright Writers of Dayton. We meet the last Saturday of each month at a central location.

Send an email with the subject
“I want to join the WWD”
to ruthapeck@aol.com.
We will reply to you with
more information.

Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. Click on the “follow” button. Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide our followers with informative newsletters every month. Our followers will be the first to know when we have special events such as writing seminars at libraries, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signing events where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

Follow today and get the benefits every month!

May 2019 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green

Book of the Month

Stein On Writing: A Master Editor of Some of the Most Successful Writers of Our Century Shares His Craft Techniques and Strategies

Stein on Writing provides immediately useful advice for all writers of fiction and nonfiction, whether they are newcomers or old hands, students or instructors, amateurs or professionals. As the always clear and direct Stein explains here, “This is not a book of theory. It is a book of usable solutions–how to fix writing that is flawed, how to improve writing that is good, how to create interesting writing in the first place.” With examples from bestsellers as well as from students’ drafts, Stein offers detailed sections on characterization, dialogue, pacing, flashbacks, trimming away flabby wording, the so-called “triage” method of revision, using the techniques of fiction to enliven nonfiction, and more.Stein on Writing provides immediately useful advice for all writers of fiction and nonfiction, whether they are newcomers or old hands, students or instructors, amateurs or professionals. As the always clear and direct Stein explains here, “This is not a book of theory. It is a book of usable solutions–how to fix writing that is flawed, how to improve writing that is good, how to create interesting writing in the first place.” With examples from bestsellers as well as from students’ drafts, Stein offers detailed sections on characterization, dialogue, pacing, flashbacks, trimming away flabby wording, the so-called “triage” method of revision, using the techniques of fiction to enliven nonfiction, and more.

Source: Amazon

Quote of the Month

Nurturing Idea - Raindrops Falling on Sprout Growing on Hand

Some authors, when starting a novel, imagine a place first. Others, a character starts taking shape in their head. I start with a hook, a situation, a ‘what if.’

Linwood Barclay

Source: https://www.brainyquote.com/

Word of the Month

inexorable

pronunciation:  i-NEK-suh-ruh-bul

Definition : not to be persuaded, moved, or stopped : relentless

Did You Know?

The Latin antecedent of inexorable is inexorabilis, which is itself a combination of the prefix in-, meaning “not,” plus exorabilis, meaning “pliant” or “capable of being moved by entreaty.” It’s a fitting etymology for inexorable. You can beseech and implore until you’re blue in the face, but that won’t have any effect on something that’s inexorable. Inexorable has been a part of the English language since the 1500s. Originally, it was often applied to people or sometimes to personified things, as in “deaf and inexorable laws.” These days, it is usually applied to things, as in “inexorable monotony” or “an inexorable trend.” In such cases, it essentially means “unyielding” or “inflexible.”

Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

Like the Wright Writers of
Dayton Facebook Page

Click link below.

www.facebook.com/wright

Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. Click on the “follow” button. Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide our followers with informative newsletters every month. Our followers will be the first to know when we have special events such as writing seminars at libraries, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signing events where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

Follow today and get the benefits every month!

January 2019 Newsletter

Article of the Month

Potential of the Future
by Colleen Green

January is a time of reflection of the past and looking forward to the potential of the future. New year’s resolutions are made, but unfortunately can be disregarded by October or even sooner. I am in favor of having yearly goals if they are realistic. Why set yourself up for failure? It is better to be cautiously optimistic than overly enthusiastic. If you want to succeed, the best way is to take your end of year goal and break it up into twelve steps to accomplish one every thirty days or so. You can make progress this way and stay on track. It gives you a sense of accomplishment to complete each task. If personal interruptions or unforeseen events sets you back, you might need to do double duty the next month to make up for that bump in the road. Put the goal on your mirror by using notes. After you complete the thirty-day goal, put up the next one. This will make you look at it every day and probably multiple times. It is a visual aid to remind you of your daily intentions to heighten your self-awareness. Consistency is about having enough discipline to make an effort each day. Some days you will have more time than others for your project, and that is okay because it has to be. If you track your weekly time, you can gradually increase it when possible. Your time will add up every week. Anything worth doing right takes a while to accomplish. The only person you should compare your progress to is yourself. For example, if my yearly goal is to write a new book every year, it is possible that in the future I may get to the point where I can write two books a year. Comparing myself to authors who only write and do not need to work full time for a living would be a mistake as would be comparing myself to a seasoned writer who had been doing it longer. That would only frustrate me and would do me no good. Instead, I focus on my ability to improve my writing by learning from my editor’s notes and comments. Each time I go through an edit, I learn how to make better decisions with many aspects of the written word. Between writing two books, I have gotten better at dialogue, character arcs, giving detailed background setting information, creating sympathy for my main character, and creating friction between characters without taking things too far. When you consistently work on a skill you will learn and grow. To me that is a reward unto itself because I’ve made progress. Follow my twelve-step plan for your yearly goal, and I bet you’ll grow and learn as you go. At the end of the year, write down all the aspects about your project in which you have gained new knowledge that you can apply to the following year’s goal. After you reach your goal at the end of December or sooner, celebrate the fact that you did it.

Colleen Green is a member of the Wright Writers of Dayton. She is the editor of the newsletter, a speaker, and an author of romance/suspense books.

Links to her books below.

Last Words 
Book One in The Amber Milestone Series

https://amzn.to/2VDpTb8

City in the Middle
Book Two in the Amber Milestone Series

https://amzn.to/2FeJklg

inspirational quote nature

Word of the Month

Equivocal

Equivocal adj. Open to more than one interpretation; ambiguous. Uncertain or questionable in nature. “Congress was equivocal on its domestic spending package.”

source: http://www.wordthink.com/

Like the Wright Writers of
Dayton Facebook Page

Click link below.

www.facebook.com/wright

Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. 

Click on the “follow” button.