January 2019 Newsletter

Article of the Month

Potential of the Future
by Colleen Green

January is a time of reflection of the past and looking forward to the potential of the future. New year’s resolutions are made, but unfortunately can be disregarded by October or even sooner. I am in favor of having yearly goals if they are realistic. Why set yourself up for failure? It is better to be cautiously optimistic than overly enthusiastic. If you want to succeed, the best way is to take your end of year goal and break it up into twelve steps to accomplish one every thirty days or so. You can make progress this way and stay on track. It gives you a sense of accomplishment to complete each task. If personal interruptions or unforeseen events sets you back, you might need to do double duty the next month to make up for that bump in the road. Put the goal on your mirror by using notes. After you complete the thirty-day goal, put up the next one. This will make you look at it every day and probably multiple times. It is a visual aid to remind you of your daily intentions to heighten your self-awareness. Consistency is about having enough discipline to make an effort each day. Some days you will have more time than others for your project, and that is okay because it has to be. If you track your weekly time, you can gradually increase it when possible. Your time will add up every week. Anything worth doing right takes a while to accomplish. The only person you should compare your progress to is yourself. For example, if my yearly goal is to write a new book every year, it is possible that in the future I may get to the point where I can write two books a year. Comparing myself to authors who only write and do not need to work full time for a living would be a mistake as would be comparing myself to a seasoned writer who had been doing it longer. That would only frustrate me and would do me no good. Instead, I focus on my ability to improve my writing by learning from my editor’s notes and comments. Each time I go through an edit, I learn how to make better decisions with many aspects of the written word. Between writing two books, I have gotten better at dialogue, character arcs, giving detailed background setting information, creating sympathy for my main character, and creating friction between characters without taking things too far. When you consistently work on a skill you will learn and grow. To me that is a reward unto itself because I’ve made progress. Follow my twelve-step plan for your yearly goal, and I bet you’ll grow and learn as you go. At the end of the year, write down all the aspects about your project in which you have gained new knowledge that you can apply to the following year’s goal. After you reach your goal at the end of December or sooner, celebrate the fact that you did it.

Colleen Green is a member of the Wright Writers of Dayton. She is the editor of the newsletter, a speaker, and an author of romance/suspense books.

Links to her books below.

Last Words 
Book One in The Amber Milestone Series

https://amzn.to/2VDpTb8

City in the Middle
Book Two in the Amber Milestone Series

https://amzn.to/2FeJklg

inspirational quote nature

Word of the Month

Equivocal

Equivocal adj. Open to more than one interpretation; ambiguous. Uncertain or questionable in nature. “Congress was equivocal on its domestic spending package.”

source: http://www.wordthink.com/

Like the Wright Writers of
Dayton Facebook Page

Click link below.

www.facebook.com/wright

Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. 

Click on the “follow” button.

Advertisements