April 2019 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green

Book of the Month

JESS MONTGOMERY
Kinship, Ohio, 1924: When Lily Ross learns that her husband, Daniel Ross, the town’s widely respected sheriff, is killed while transporting a prisoner, she is devastated and vows to avenge his death.

Hours after his funeral, a stranger appears at her door. Marvena Whitcomb, a coal miner’s widow, is unaware that Daniel has died, and begs to speak with him about her missing daughter.

From miles away but worlds apart, Lily and Marvena’s lives collide as they realize that Daniel was not the man that either of them believed him to be—and that his murder is far more complex than either of them could have imagined.

Inspired by the true story of Ohio’s first female sheriff, this is a powerful debut about two women’s search for justice as they take on the corruption at the heart of their community.

Bio

Under Jess’s given name, she is a newspaper columnist, focusing on the literary life, authors and events of her native Dayton, Ohio for the Dayton Daily News. Her first novel in the Kinship Historical Mystery series, THE WIDOWS, garnered awards even before publication: Montgomery County (Ohio) Arts & Cultural District (MCAD) Artist Opportunity Grant (2018); Individual Excellence Award (2016) in Literary Arts from Ohio Arts Council; John E. Nance Writer in Residence at Thurber House (Columbus, Ohio) in 2014.

Source: Amazon
Available to buy on Amazon.
Click link below.

https://www.amazon.com/gp

Word of the Month

arduous

pronunciation AHR-juh-wus

Definition

1. a : hard to accomplish or achieve b : marked by great labor or effort 

2. hard to climb 

Did You Know?

“To forgive is the most arduous pitch human nature can arrive at.” When Richard Steele published that line in The Guardian in 1713, he was using arduous in what was apparently a fairly new way for English writers in his day: to imply that something was steep or lofty as well as difficult or strenuous. Steele’s use is one of the earliest documented in English for that meaning, but he didn’t commit it to paper until almost 150 years after the first uses of the word in its “strenuous” sense. Although the “steep” sense is newer, it is still true to the word’s origins; arduous derives from the Latin arduus, which means “high,” “steep,” or “difficult.”

 

Example: Every summer, right before the beginning of the new school year, the football team begins its season with “Hell Week,” an arduous six days of conditioning and training.

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Quote of the Month

investment in knowledge

Source: https://www.brainyquote.com

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Author: Author Colleen Green

I’m an author, and I'm passionate about cooking and baking. The Amber Milestone Series Book One, Last Words and Book Two, City in the Middle are available on Amazon. For more info go to my website www.colleen green.info Contact: colleen_grn@yahoo.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/ColleenPGreen

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