July 2019 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green

Book of the Month

It’s a Sweet Thing: Candy Break:
The Taste of Homemade Goodness

Judith Craig Fryman

Candy book

Source: Description from Amazon

Imagine if your grandmother owned a candy store! Or if your cousin, mother, sister, fellow parishioner, neighbor, or friend had an excellent sweet shop in an old bank building with a special vault filled with chocolate and your favorite books. It’s a Sweet Thing is a 33-year history of Judith Craig Fryman’s fun adventure in owning such a candy store beginning in 1985 in Brookville, Ohio. Her simple mission as owner of the Candy Break was to provide wholesome, handmade treats to everyone in town and to interesting customers from far-off places. The impact of her efforts was more far-reaching and enriching than you might first expect. 

Click below to buy:
www.amazon.com/Its-Sweet-Thing

Word of the Month
flounce

Definition: 1 a : to move with exaggerated jerky or bouncy motions 
b : to go with sudden determination 
2 : flounder, struggle

Did You Know?

The story behind flounce is an elusive one. The verb’s earliest recorded uses in English occurred in the mid-1500s, and some scholars believe it is related to the Norwegian verb flunsa (meaning “to hurry” or “to work briskly”) and Swedish flunsa (“to fall with a splash” or “to plunge”). The connection is uncertain, however, because the flunsa verbs did not appear in their respective languages until the 18th century, long after flounce surfaced in English. A second distinct sense of flounce, referring to a strip or ruffle of fabric attached on one edge, did not appear in English until the 18th century. This flounce derives from the Middle English frouncen, meaning “to curl.”

Examples

“With skirts flouncing, 15 young women ascended the steps … to a traditional Mexican birthday song played in a mariachi style.” — Laurel Wamsley and Vanessa Romo, NPR, 19 July 2017

“The Master of the Music flounced out with the choir flouncing out in perfect unison behind him.” — Terry Pratchett, Unseen Academicals, 2009

Source: www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

Quote of the Month

quote earlnightingale2-2xSource: www.brainyquote.com/

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Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. Click on the “follow” button. Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide our followers with informative newsletters every month. Our followers will be the first to know when we have special events such as writing seminars at libraries, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signing events where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

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June 2019 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green

Poem of the Month

CACTUS TEARS

By Vickie L. Weaver

I carefully sweep his mom’s Christmas cactus
leaves, their blooms still
red with promise,
all by his tears long sodden,
drooped and fallen
into darkness
between the table and the wall—
then gently gather them
into the ready receptacle
and carry them to the rich garden
where chameleon skies
can reflect green eyes.

Quote of the Month

Character is like a tree and reputation like a shadow. The shadow is what we think of it; the tree is the real thing.

Abraham Lincoln 

Source: www.brainyquote.com/

Word of the Month

pronunciation: rih-MIT-unss


Definition

1 a : a sum of money remitted

b : an instrument by which money is remitted

2 : transmittal of money (as to a distant place)

Did You Know?

Since the 14th century, the verb remit has afforded a variety of meanings, including “to lay aside (a mood or disposition),” “to release from the guilt or penalty of,” “to submit or refer for consideration,” and “to postpone or defer.” It is derived from Latin mittere (meaning “to let go” or “to send”), which is also the root of the English verbs admit, commit, emit, omit, permit, submit, and transmit. Use of remittance in financial contexts referring to the release of money as payment isn’t transacted until the 17th century.


Examples

“PayPal has everything it needs to send money to friends or family or to pay bills, even across borders. Its acquisition of Xoom in 2015 gave it a strong position in digital remittance.” — Adam Levy, The Motley Fool, 14 Dec. 2018

“Kit … knew that his old home was a very poor place…, and often indited square-folded letters to his mother, enclosing a shilling or eighteenpence or such other small remittance, which Mr Abel’s liberality enabled him to make.” — Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop, 1841

Source: www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

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Dayton Facebook Page

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If you are a serious writer, we invite you to join the Wright Writers of Dayton. We meet the last Saturday of each month at a central location.

Send an email with the subject
“I want to join the WWD”
to ruthapeck@aol.com.
We will reply to you with
more information.

Follow this blog to get notified via email when we post newsletters. Click on the “follow” button. Wright Writers of Dayton appreciates their followers. We will provide our followers with informative newsletters every month. Our followers will be the first to know when we have special events such as writing seminars at libraries, new book releases from any of our authors, and book signing events where you can meet our authors and pick up their latest books.

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May 2019 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green

Book of the Month

Stein On Writing: A Master Editor of Some of the Most Successful Writers of Our Century Shares His Craft Techniques and Strategies

Stein on Writing provides immediately useful advice for all writers of fiction and nonfiction, whether they are newcomers or old hands, students or instructors, amateurs or professionals. As the always clear and direct Stein explains here, “This is not a book of theory. It is a book of usable solutions–how to fix writing that is flawed, how to improve writing that is good, how to create interesting writing in the first place.” With examples from bestsellers as well as from students’ drafts, Stein offers detailed sections on characterization, dialogue, pacing, flashbacks, trimming away flabby wording, the so-called “triage” method of revision, using the techniques of fiction to enliven nonfiction, and more.Stein on Writing provides immediately useful advice for all writers of fiction and nonfiction, whether they are newcomers or old hands, students or instructors, amateurs or professionals. As the always clear and direct Stein explains here, “This is not a book of theory. It is a book of usable solutions–how to fix writing that is flawed, how to improve writing that is good, how to create interesting writing in the first place.” With examples from bestsellers as well as from students’ drafts, Stein offers detailed sections on characterization, dialogue, pacing, flashbacks, trimming away flabby wording, the so-called “triage” method of revision, using the techniques of fiction to enliven nonfiction, and more.

Source: Amazon

Quote of the Month

Nurturing Idea - Raindrops Falling on Sprout Growing on Hand

Some authors, when starting a novel, imagine a place first. Others, a character starts taking shape in their head. I start with a hook, a situation, a ‘what if.’

Linwood Barclay

Source: https://www.brainyquote.com/

Word of the Month

inexorable

pronunciation:  i-NEK-suh-ruh-bul

Definition : not to be persuaded, moved, or stopped : relentless

Did You Know?

The Latin antecedent of inexorable is inexorabilis, which is itself a combination of the prefix in-, meaning “not,” plus exorabilis, meaning “pliant” or “capable of being moved by entreaty.” It’s a fitting etymology for inexorable. You can beseech and implore until you’re blue in the face, but that won’t have any effect on something that’s inexorable. Inexorable has been a part of the English language since the 1500s. Originally, it was often applied to people or sometimes to personified things, as in “deaf and inexorable laws.” These days, it is usually applied to things, as in “inexorable monotony” or “an inexorable trend.” In such cases, it essentially means “unyielding” or “inflexible.”

Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

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April 2019 Newsletter

Editor: Colleen Green

Book of the Month

JESS MONTGOMERY
Kinship, Ohio, 1924: When Lily Ross learns that her husband, Daniel Ross, the town’s widely respected sheriff, is killed while transporting a prisoner, she is devastated and vows to avenge his death.

Hours after his funeral, a stranger appears at her door. Marvena Whitcomb, a coal miner’s widow, is unaware that Daniel has died, and begs to speak with him about her missing daughter.

From miles away but worlds apart, Lily and Marvena’s lives collide as they realize that Daniel was not the man that either of them believed him to be—and that his murder is far more complex than either of them could have imagined.

Inspired by the true story of Ohio’s first female sheriff, this is a powerful debut about two women’s search for justice as they take on the corruption at the heart of their community.

Bio

Under Jess’s given name, she is a newspaper columnist, focusing on the literary life, authors and events of her native Dayton, Ohio for the Dayton Daily News. Her first novel in the Kinship Historical Mystery series, THE WIDOWS, garnered awards even before publication: Montgomery County (Ohio) Arts & Cultural District (MCAD) Artist Opportunity Grant (2018); Individual Excellence Award (2016) in Literary Arts from Ohio Arts Council; John E. Nance Writer in Residence at Thurber House (Columbus, Ohio) in 2014.

Source: Amazon
Available to buy on Amazon.
Click link below.

https://www.amazon.com/gp

Word of the Month

arduous

pronunciation AHR-juh-wus

Definition

1. a : hard to accomplish or achieve b : marked by great labor or effort 

2. hard to climb 

Did You Know?

“To forgive is the most arduous pitch human nature can arrive at.” When Richard Steele published that line in The Guardian in 1713, he was using arduous in what was apparently a fairly new way for English writers in his day: to imply that something was steep or lofty as well as difficult or strenuous. Steele’s use is one of the earliest documented in English for that meaning, but he didn’t commit it to paper until almost 150 years after the first uses of the word in its “strenuous” sense. Although the “steep” sense is newer, it is still true to the word’s origins; arduous derives from the Latin arduus, which means “high,” “steep,” or “difficult.”

 

Example: Every summer, right before the beginning of the new school year, the football team begins its season with “Hell Week,” an arduous six days of conditioning and training.

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Quote of the Month

investment in knowledge

Source: https://www.brainyquote.com

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March 2019 Newsletter

Book of the Month

the silence of murder

Seventeen-year-old Hope Long’s life revolves around her brother Jeremy. So when Jeremy is accused of killing the town’s beloved baseball coach, Hope’s world begins to unravel. Everyone is convinced Jeremy did it, and since he hasn’t spoken a word in 9 years, he’s unable to defend himself. Their lawyer instructs Hope to convince the jury that Jeremy is insane, but all her life Hope has known that Jeremy’s just different than other people—better, even. As she works to prove his innocence—joined by her best friend T.J. and the sheriff’s son, Chase—Hope uncovers secrets about the murder, the townspeople, her family, and herself. She knows her brother isn’t the murderer. But as she comes closer to the truth, she’s terrified to find out who is.

Source: Goodread.com

Dandi Daley Mackall

I love to write. I even love to rewrite. Before I could hold a pen, I was making up stories in my head. I’m blessed to have come from a family of great storytellers. My two favorite words growing up were: ‘Member when . . . I started out writing for grown-ups . . . and then I had kids. When my children were little, I wrote board books, then picture books, then easy readers, and so on to young adult novels. But I never stopped writing for any age group, which means I get to write for all ages. How cool is that! I grew up in Missouri, have lived in many cities and towns since, and now write from rural Ohio, surrounded by my wonderful family, including horses, dogs, cats, and an occasional squirrel or raccoon.

Source: http://www.dandibooks.com 

Quote of the Month

benjaminfranklin3-2x

Source: https://www.brainyquote.com

Word of the Month

obsequious 
marked by or exhibiting a fawning attentiveness

Did You Know?

An obsequious person is more likely to be a follower than a leader. Use that fact to help you remember the meaning of obsequious. All you need to do is bear in mind that the word comes from the Latin root sequi, meaning “to follow.” (The other contributor is the prefix ob-, meaning “toward.”) Sequi is the source of a number of other English words, too, including consequence (a result that follows from an action), sequel (a novel, film, or TV show that follows and continues a story begun in another), and non sequitur (a conclusion that doesn’t follow from what was said before).

Example: “Not pleasing others enough amounts to surliness, pleasing too much makes one obsequious—you have to be friendly, but not too friendly. The sweet spot in the middle is where you want to be.” — Carlin Flora, Psychology Today, 1 July 2017

Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

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Editor
Colleen Green

February 2019 Newsletter

Book of the Month

last words revised

The revised edition of Last Words has a new and exciting cover. The romance book has an improved plot with more twists and turns to keep you reading until the last word. The steamy novel is written by Wright Writer of Dayton member, Colleen Green. She is the editor of the newsletter and admins their Facebook page.

Amber Milestone loves her job as a chef at Hale’s View, an upscale restaurant next to Hale Vineyards in Napa Valley, California. She works with her stepfather, who is a partner in the business with Mr. Hale. Amber has more than just a business relationship with Mr. Hale’s son, Jack. She is swept away by Jack’s handsome smile and charmed by his romantic side, which has no limitations when it comes to money or connections. Amidst the lush landscape of the vineyards, she finds herself in a world of seduction that blurs the line between true love and raw passion. Amber and Jack’s devotion to each other is tested by the corrupt world of money and power that threatens to destroy everything they have begun to build. Amber’s dreams of owning her own restaurant are within her reach, but everything comes with a price.

Kindle Edition of Last Words
Limited Time on Sale
99 cents
Jan. 29th through Feb. 5th

Click below to get yours
before the price goes back up.

 https://tinyurl.com/y8slys92 

Word of the Month
charisma

1: a personal magic of leadership arousing special popular loyalty or enthusiasm for a public figure (such as a political leader)

2: a special magnetic charm or appeal

Did You Know?

The Greek word charisma means “favor” or “gift.” It is derived from the verb charizesthai (“to favor”), which in turn comes from the noun charis, meaning “grace.” In English, charisma has been used in Christian contexts since the mid-1500s to refer to a gift or power bestowed upon an individual by the Holy Spirit for the good of the Church, a sense that is now very rare. The earliest nonreligious use of charisma that we know of occurred in a German text, a 1922 publication by sociologist Max Weber.

Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

Quote of the Month

love and be lovedSource: https://www.brainyquote.com/

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January 2019 Newsletter

Article of the Month

Potential of the Future
by Colleen Green

January is a time of reflection of the past and looking forward to the potential of the future. New year’s resolutions are made, but unfortunately can be disregarded by October or even sooner. I am in favor of having yearly goals if they are realistic. Why set yourself up for failure? It is better to be cautiously optimistic than overly enthusiastic. If you want to succeed, the best way is to take your end of year goal and break it up into twelve steps to accomplish one every thirty days or so. You can make progress this way and stay on track. It gives you a sense of accomplishment to complete each task. If personal interruptions or unforeseen events sets you back, you might need to do double duty the next month to make up for that bump in the road. Put the goal on your mirror by using notes. After you complete the thirty-day goal, put up the next one. This will make you look at it every day and probably multiple times. It is a visual aid to remind you of your daily intentions to heighten your self-awareness. Consistency is about having enough discipline to make an effort each day. Some days you will have more time than others for your project, and that is okay because it has to be. If you track your weekly time, you can gradually increase it when possible. Your time will add up every week. Anything worth doing right takes a while to accomplish. The only person you should compare your progress to is yourself. For example, if my yearly goal is to write a new book every year, it is possible that in the future I may get to the point where I can write two books a year. Comparing myself to authors who only write and do not need to work full time for a living would be a mistake as would be comparing myself to a seasoned writer who had been doing it longer. That would only frustrate me and would do me no good. Instead, I focus on my ability to improve my writing by learning from my editor’s notes and comments. Each time I go through an edit, I learn how to make better decisions with many aspects of the written word. Between writing two books, I have gotten better at dialogue, character arcs, giving detailed background setting information, creating sympathy for my main character, and creating friction between characters without taking things too far. When you consistently work on a skill you will learn and grow. To me that is a reward unto itself because I’ve made progress. Follow my twelve-step plan for your yearly goal, and I bet you’ll grow and learn as you go. At the end of the year, write down all the aspects about your project in which you have gained new knowledge that you can apply to the following year’s goal. After you reach your goal at the end of December or sooner, celebrate the fact that you did it.

Colleen Green is a member of the Wright Writers of Dayton. She is the editor of the newsletter, a speaker, and an author of romance/suspense books.

Links to her books below.

Last Words 
Book One in The Amber Milestone Series

https://amzn.to/2VDpTb8

City in the Middle
Book Two in the Amber Milestone Series

https://amzn.to/2FeJklg

inspirational quote nature

Word of the Month

Equivocal

Equivocal adj. Open to more than one interpretation; ambiguous. Uncertain or questionable in nature. “Congress was equivocal on its domestic spending package.”

source: http://www.wordthink.com/

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